Superstitious Minds

106
I’ve just finished binge watching the BBC miniseries, Rome.

I won’t spoil the ending for those who haven’t seen it and don’t know their history or their Shakespeare. All I’ll say is that I was pretty sad when Octavian’s forces defeated Mark Antony’s army prompting Antony to commit suicide.

As well an engaging story line filled with legions of attractive men in uniform, Rome offers glimpses into ancient Roman life. I particularly enjoyed scenes like the one where Vorenus damns his family to Hades. Vorenus immediately regrets this rash action. His brother in arms, Pullo offers reassurance. As long as an animal wasn’t killed on the curse, it can be reversed. (Duh–everybody knows a curse doesn’t “take” unless you make a sacrifice to it. Why was Vorenus so worried?)

I admit to feeling a bit smug watching too grown men worrying over the power of a curse. These are clearly characters living in an unenlightened age before scientific discovery and universal access to education. Of course they rely on superstition to explain the mysteries of their world.

Then my sailor and I went grocery shopping. Loading our stuff in the back of the truck, a box of tissues fell out of a bag.

I noticed the picture on the side of the box.

“Oh my Gosh! I have to exchange these tissues!”

“Why?”

“There’s birds on the box!”

My sailor looked at me with raised eyebrows.

“Duh–everybody knows images of birds are bad luck.”

He groaned. He may have even looked a little smug. “You’ll be in line for ages. It’s really busy.”

“Fine.” I climbed in the truck. “We’ll risk taking them home.”

It should be okay since we haven’t sacrificed an animal.